Posts Tagged "Boards"

Marla Cornelius
February 12, 2016

In this blog, CompassPoint board expert Marla Cornelius shares 10 practical and practicable tips to elevate the impact of board chairs to better serve their organizations. Guaranteed you'll find at least one, if not a few, helpful pointers for your board.
 

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Marla Cornelius
April 22, 2015

The job of board members is very complex, and by nature, intensely collaborative. Making the most of board meetings isn’t just a good habit to aspire to, it’s essential to good governance, strong leadership, and healthy organizations. In this blog, CompassPoint Senior Project Director Marla Cornelius shares eight actionable tips to unlock the potential of board members so they can make the most of their time together.
 

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Marla Cornelius
February 20, 2015

BoardSource recently released Leading with Intent, their 2014 index of nonprofit board practices (download for free from their website). In this post, CompassPoint governance consultant and trainer Marla Cornelius looks at the report’s findings in the area of inclusion, a critical component of board culture, and what might be behind a concerning disconnect revealed in the data. She encourages executives and board leaders to read the full report and bring the information that they find most useful to an upcoming board meeting.
 

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Marla Cornelius
December 9, 2014

What does it take to thrive as a board chair? In this post, CompassPoint governance consultant Marla Cornelius shares key takeaways from one of our newest programs, Thriving as a Board Chair. This cohort based learning experience for board chairs blends CompassPoint’s governance content, expert facilitation, and peer learning. Do her reflections resonate with your board experience?
 

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Marla Cornelius
May 27, 2014

In this blog, CompassPoint governance consultant Marla Cornelius emphasizes that the board chair’s most important role is not just knowing what to “do” to manage the organization’s board, but more importantly how to “be” a facilitator and lever of organizational change. 
 

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JR Yeager
February 24, 2014

In the blog “Interim EDs: Making a Good Thing Work for You,” I wrote about the purpose and value added by engaging an interim executive director (ED) while you and other members of the Board of Directors step back and take some time to assess your organization’s current needs and prepare yourselves and the staff for working with a new permanent ED. In this post, I share my best advice on the Board’s role in this temporary relationship, focusing on how to partner with your interim ED and what to expect.
 

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Peggy McGuire
January 15, 2014

This is a “white water” time in health care. The historic Affordable Care Act is opening access to health insurance to our country’s most vulnerable people (except the undocumented), yet it’s also straining our already overwhelmed public health system. For Bay Area cancer service providers like the Women’s Cancer Resource Center (WCRC), where I serve as executive director, the layoffs and program closures resulting from the “Great Recession” and the exit of the American Cancer Society from direct service have brought additional, formidable gaps in fragile safety net services.
 

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Marla Cornelius
October 11, 2013

In Part 1 of this 2-part series on nonprofit governance, Marla Cornelius wrote about the executive director’s role in governance. This week, in part two, she discusses the board’s role in this interdependent partnership. Marla is a Senior Project Director at CompassPoint and Board Chair at DataCenter: A Research Justice Organization.
 

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Marla Cornelius
August 14, 2013

I often hear executives complain about their boards. Many of the comments sound like this:

  • My board is disengaged. I understand that they are busy and I don’t want to ask for too much, but I can barely get them to come to meetings.
  • My board doesn’t take responsibility for their own work. Why do I have to cajole them when they should be attending to their own affairs?
  • My board doesn’t understand what our staff even does. They want to get involved in the day-to-day work and don’t see that they’re micromanaging.
     
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